tsukiyama-shoo:

tsukiyama-shoo:

please tell me im not the only one who remembers that photoset/gif that went around where it has the final scenes of death note where light is trying to defend himself but someone replaced the text so it was him teaching them how to swim

image

Also social/personality wise;
Ri is pretty chill with talking but you have to know her for like an hour or so before she’ll say much more than quiet and short answers. Not the most social but she’s aight. ;
Slothy will talk to you if you talk to her or get her attention somehow, this is how I try to stay most of the time. ;
Ryan is a brat about talking and usually tries to pass the job of entertainment off to someone else so she can do whatever she wants.
One with my actual name will talk if you seem cool if if there’s a need to. She’s usually used as my at the mall/talking on the phone/talking to friends type. ;
And Bonus Kerian will talk to anyone it doesn’t matter if he even so much as thinks you said somethin he likes he’ll butt in to the convo.

Tbh if I draw my “two” personalities separately they really don’t seem like they’d be the same person. Basically that’s the whole Ri vs Slothy vs Ryan vs my real name thing. Ri is darn near either of them, Slothy is leaning more towards the girlier one(3rd pic), Ryan is almost fully the punk(2nd pic), and my real name is almost fully the girly one(again 3rd pic) They make making OCs/reader insert characters a pain in the butt

urgetocreate:

David Hockney, “Dog Days” painting, 1990’s

urgetocreate:

David Hockney, “Dog Days” painting, 1990’s

verticalart:

Sketchdump!  Mostly fanart I’ve doodled in between commissions and other projects.  

I hope you’re all doing well, by the way!  I hope you have a good day.  I’m getting ready to graduate in a few months and that’s pretty scary.  

waggington:

u start a mosh pit in my heart

egg

joshpeck:

reblog if you agree

airagorncharda:

incompleteicarus:

Guys, if you speak Japanese or Korean, or even if you don’t, please send a message to sercgakisei because he’s a disabled non-binary Korean/Chinese/Japanese teen who has been bullied by weeaboos on this site for not speaking English very well. His father has taken over his account and will translate the English messages for him.

please do this

lesbianvenom:

when steve rogers sleeps for 70 years he’s hailed “a hero” and “an icon” but when i take a five hour nap my mom says i’m “lazy” and “need to find better ways to spend my time” such bullshit

i think if your brain didnt take the serotonin back in, it would be like adhd or something like that (im probably competely wrong, im just guessing dont take my word on that whatsoever)
Anonymous

Hm! That’s a good theory! Even if it might not be true, it could make a lot if sense… I’ve met people with ADHD and depression so I don’t think that’d work tho…

Reblog if you can proudly admit you’ve never sent anon hate.

Being allergic to mosquito bites like

greg-house-md:

Somehow the the sad meds faces make me sad…

Every person who reblogs this post will get a pokemon egg in their submit for their muse. I’ll use a randomizer to find out which pokemon you get

darksoultrinity:

There will be no legendaries

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.